High Tea at London’s Kensington Palace  

High tea (or afternoon tea, apparently, based on your feedback!) is a quintessential – and delicious – way to spend an afternoon in London. And, you can take the London High Tea one step further with a reservation at Kensington Palace’s Orangery, which serves afternoon tea in a royal palace setting. Scones, sandwiches and pastries, galore! Tea time takes about two hours (that is, if you’re doing it right!), and is definitely best earlier in the day so you can still save room for a London dinner. Drink up, my friends, and enjoy this taste of London!

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English afternoon tea etiquette  

Leading UK etiquette coach and broadcaster William Hanson demonstrates the correct way to enjoy afternoon tea.

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Argentinian Chorizo Sausage in Great Sandwiches Tasted in Soho. London Street Food 

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The British Museum in London Walking Tour  

A Walking tour around the British Museum in London focussing on all the major exhibits. The British Museum is a museum in London dedicated to human history and culture. Its permanent collection, numbering some 8 million works, is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence and originates from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginnings to the present. The British Museum was established in 1753, largely based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum first opened to the public on 15 January 1759 in Montagu House in Bloomsbury, on the site of the current museum building. Its expansion over the following two and a half centuries was largely a result of an expanding British colonial footprint and has resulted in the creation of several branch institutions, the first being the British Museum (Natural History) in South Kensington in 1881. Some objects in the collection, most notably the Elgin Marbles from the Parthenon, are the objects of controversy and of calls for restitution to their countries of origin.

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258 years of the British Museum  

The British Museum opened its doors to visitors 258 years ago this month, on 15 January 1759. The first national public museum in the world, it was – and still is – open to ‘all studious and curious persons’. To celebrate the anniversary, Director Hartwig Fischer talks about the people who come to the Museum today, and the people who are represented in the collection. At first, the Museum had around 50 visitors a day. Now there are around 15,000 people in the Museum every day, plus half a million who engage online through the website and social media. The conversation has become global – fitting for a museum of the world, for the world.

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London, England: British Museum 

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How to do London: Weather – London Travel Guide

 

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